Manual The Shape of the Final Dog and Other Stories

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Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Best known as the original screenwriter of Blade Runner, author Hampton Fancher makes his debut with this extraordinary collection that bears all of the hallmarks that have made him beloved to film fans.

These are also stories about survival and instinct, with elements of the absurd and the sublime. The Shape of the Final Dog is a rare literary work that is mordantly funny, deftly written, and bound to delight and entertain. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Other Editions 2. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Shape of the Final Dog , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about The Shape of the Final Dog. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

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Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Sep 07, Matt Puz rated it really liked it. I came upon this book because I am in love with both Blade Runner movies and I was eager to get a glimpse of Fancher as an author. That said, this is a very strange collection of stories. I'm not entirely sure what they mean or what their ultimate point was. But I know that when I was in the middle of them, I was captivated. Enigmatic, sardonic, and surreal. Again, I'm not sure specifically what it was that caught my eye.

It's like waking up from a dream with a smile on your face and the dream e I came upon this book because I am in love with both Blade Runner movies and I was eager to get a glimpse of Fancher as an author.

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It's like waking up from a dream with a smile on your face and the dream erased from memory. If you're open-minded, consider this collection. But don't get too lost in trying to figure it out. Just enjoy it while you're there. Apr 13, Pop Bop rated it really liked it Shelves: reviewed. A Wealth of Strangeness The opening short story in this collection, "The Black Weasel", follows a bartender who flees his failed job in New York and slinks home to try to regain his old job as a carnival barker. The return is filled with brief bits about the characters who revolve around the carnival.

That story sets up the theme, if you want to call it that, of this collection - the freaks, losers and oddballs who exist on every rung of society. Back in Donald Ray Pollock released his book, A Wealth of Strangeness The opening short story in this collection, "The Black Weasel", follows a bartender who flees his failed job in New York and slinks home to try to regain his old job as a carnival barker. We know that children are abused and suffer, yet when we meet some of these children we often don't understand how to help them. This book of stories from Doctor Perry's practice shows us children who come from backgrounds of neglect or abuse.

These stories tear at your heart, but knowing that Doctor Perry and others are using what we know about neuroscience to heal offers us hope. If anything, reading this book will mak This book should be read by everyone who cares for children professionally. If anything, reading this book will make you realize the amazing power of touch in your own life.

And you can go out and use touch to help heal the world: Some people I have recommended this book to in the fields of health and childcare say that they couldn't read it because it sounds too upsetting. I think that if you work with children and you want to live in a "my little pony land" you will be hurting those who need you most.

You can't help children and work toward changing the world for children if you remain ignorant. Sep 24, Peacegal rated it liked it. Using case studies from the author's practice, this book focuses upon the incredible growth, development and malleability of the human brain. Depending upon your personal preferences, you may or may not appreciate the author's frequent digressions into the biology of the brain to describe what his patients are experiencing.

The fairly frequent discussion of animal experimentation saddened me, especially when considering that numerous experiments conducted in the name of psychological science ten Using case studies from the author's practice, this book focuses upon the incredible growth, development and malleability of the human brain. The fairly frequent discussion of animal experimentation saddened me, especially when considering that numerous experiments conducted in the name of psychological science tend to involve what we generally think of as the worst aspects of vivisection--prolonged distress, painful stimuli, invasive surgeries.

Aug 29, Mary Christensen rated it it was ok Shelves: nonfiction. This book has almost no redeeming qualities. In fact, its primary worth is undoubtedly as a clear example of multiple cultural failings. It is the most obvious, cringe-worthy trauma porn. It is primarily a titillated retelling of the most horrifying situations.

It is a collection of carnival sideshows to chill and entertain the masses. Perry has a Savior Complex to make Jesus blush. In every story, there will be a Suffering Child. In every story, no other person will understand, will listen This book has almost no redeeming qualities.

In every story, no other person will understand, will listen, will gain the child's trust. But then, here he comes to save the day! The mighty Perry! All of the "science" in this book is garbage. He literally has four scientific concepts in his grasp: mirror neurons, hyperarousal, disassociation, and evolution. The "brain science" is just readily observable facts about the human experience eg, "when stress is unpredictable, it's more stressful" , sloppily paired with rat studies.

And his assertions about human evolution are childishly over-confident and painfully post hoc. Perry repeatedly tells stories in which he undertook, in a professional capacity, to do things he was unqualified to do, and then goes on to make himself the hero of those stories. That's not heroism. It's malpractice. Everything that Perry "discovers" about working with traumatized children could only count as a discovery by the most socially inept, non-empathetic person imaginable.

Any skilled mother or nurse would count all of his "research" as common knowledge. Leave it to a white man to give himself credit for "discovering" that children need structure, affection, and safety, or that beating or intimidating a child will not help them recover from abuse. Jan 10, Bethany rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , psych. Bruce Perry writes, in conjunction with journalist Maia Szalavitz, about some of the most distinctive cases that he has worked over his years as a child psychiatrist.

In the process, Perry makes powerful arguments for early intervention in the lives of traumatized children, and gives many insights into working with troubled people of all ages. There are some tremendously sad stories contained within these pages. Anyone who works with children, particularly children who have behavioral issues, should read this book. It is informative, well-written, and enlightening.

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Feb 16, Rachel rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. An eye-opening book on child trauma, using case studies to explore how trauma affects the brain, body, and behavior, and how clinicians, practitioners, parents, and other adults can play a role in healing this trauma. I think this is a must-read for anyone who works with children - not just children who are known to have been exposed to trauma. I love reading books on psychology and the title of this book definately got my attention but I sadly found the book afar from any literary taste.


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Since I'm not a therapist who wants to collect some info on traumatized children, I could not get involved with the stories at all. I also found the stories were disjointed and I had a very hard time following this book.

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Loved the way it was written. Very easy to digest and process. The reported episodes were very challenging to process and picture, touching and heartbreaking. I highly recommend this book cause it explains at length how the brain develops during childhood and how trauma and nurturing can affect development, and the author manages to deliver the message in simple terms and very clearly.

Jan 27, Paul rated it really liked it. If you're at all interested in abnormal psychology, this is a fascinating book. Lovers of Oliver Sacks's books, which frequently deal with unusual brain anomalies, may find similarities in this book in that both consist of case studies of people with brain dysfunction. The primary difference with this book is that the principal author, Bruce Perry, is a child psychiatrist in Texas whose area of interest is brain trauma. There are gripping stories in this book, such as Perry's team being the one d If you're at all interested in abnormal psychology, this is a fascinating book.

There are gripping stories in this book, such as Perry's team being the one designated to be the first therapeutic interactors with the 21 children who were released from David Koresh's Branch Davidian compound in Waco before the rest of the group incinerated itself during a standoff with federal authorities.

The Shape of the Final Dog and Other Stories by Hampton Fancher | mudywehy.tk: Books

These children were so brainwashed that the first thing they did was to ask the psychiatric staff if they were going to kill them, because to those raised in the compound, everyone on the outside was a "Babylonian" that had nothing but evil intentions toward the Davidians and sought to kill them at the slightest pretext. The children had been taught to practice committing suicide in case of capture by putting handguns in their mouths and aiming for the soft palate.

The girls would not sit at the same table as the boys. The children required much individual therapy before they could adjust to the outside world and realize that all of us were not, in fact, Babylonians who wished to kill them. That to me was the most interesting story in the book. Perry and his group told the federal authorities that the entire community was expecting an Armageddon-like resolution to the standoff, and that putting pressure on the community would be the worst approach the law could take. Unfortunately, the ATF agents outside the compound decided to administer Texas justice to the Davidians, and the rest is history.

Other stories told of severely neglected or abused children who had developed reactive responses to the way they had been treated. Doctors and schoolteachers usually couldn't identify the kids' mental illnesses because the symptoms were too bizarre, and the children were often defined as having oppositional defiant disorder or ADHD. Perry instructed the adults in these situations on the nature of post-traumatic stress syndrome, which he diagnosed almost all the cases as having.

Perry's theory about the brain is perhaps unusual in that he considered abused children to have areas of their brain that were stunted or shut down. He counseled children very gently, and told their caretakers that the behavior of the child would often depend on their age at the time of trauma. One Russian boy who had been adopted had spent the first three years of his life in an orphanage with virtually no contact with adults. Perry decided that his lower reptilian brain was starved for touch, and with many hugs and gentle massages necessary for his recovery, he was able to fully heal.

One great thing about the book is that all the cases are success stories, so several of these tyrannical or dissociated children end up graduating from college. Perry developed a simple but critical approach to traumatized kids that didn't present themselves as traumatized: He would take their pulses, almost always finding them far too high, and with his gentle therapy, he would gradually bring up areas they didn't want to talk about and take their pulses.

That's when he found the instances of abuse, because the memory of them would shoot the children's pulses sky high, and Perry could very slowly allow the children to reveal what they were terrified of. This is a great book and absorbing to read, despite some of the bizarre situations the children come into therapy from--such as the boy raised as a dog put into a cage by a not-too-bright uncle who raised dogs.

Anyone interested in the brain will probably love this book. Feb 24, Chelsey rated it really liked it Shelves: 4-star-books , profession-related-books. I went in blind and I had been expecting detailed case studies about the children and how Perry treated them. That is not what this book is, whatsoever. Which is why I put it down last summer. But when I came back to it this summer, with different expectations, I couldn't put it down.

If you're looking for a set of case studies about traumatized children, this is NOT for you. This book is more of a narrative in which Perry recalls some of his cases and relates them back to his own research which I did some research on and he is HIGHLY respected. I found the cases heartbreaking but interesting. I was intrigued by everything Perry had to say, and I did learn quite a bit.

As long as you go in with the right expectations, I think this book is fantastic. Perry picked a fantastic journalist, Maia Szalavits, and it shows. The writing in the book is perfect. The language is simple, but effective. Even when Perry is explaining difficult or detailed theories and research, it is always understandable. At first, I found the book to be repetitive, Perry would restate what he had just said two pages earlier.

However, when he would repeat himself he was ALWAYS repeating difficult concepts he had previously explained AND I noticed that the second time around the descriptions were easier to understand. I'm not sure if this was done on purpose, but I feel like it might have been. Also, I love that a lot of the psychology jargon Perry uses is explained immediately after. It makes the book extremely readable to those who may be unfamiliar. As far as content, I would have liked more details about the treatment process and the actual cases, but I can't fault the book for that.

It's just a personal preference. BUT, I think Perry gives wonderful insight throughout the book.


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There are several passages I want to go back and highlight. I would recommend this for anyone who works with children or has children, as well as anyone in the mental health field. This book might seem like a review for seasoned clinicians, but I still think it's worth a read.

Oct 08, Adam rated it liked it Shelves: psychiatry , science , cognitive-neuroscience , death-penalty , psychology , parenting , non-fiction. Incredibly frustrating to write a review and watch it disappear A very insightful book into the effects of early childhood trauma. Perry explores the seemingly obvious and seemingly impossible at the same time. Of course love and empathy are important for healthy development but the extent to which early trauma can disrupt development is astonishing.

The physical, emotional, psychological, and social effects of trauma are almost unfathomable as presented by Perry, as are the ways in which Incredibly frustrating to write a review and watch it disappear The physical, emotional, psychological, and social effects of trauma are almost unfathomable as presented by Perry, as are the ways in which he aims to reverse such effects by mere application of love, trust, touch, and a return to "normal" childhood interactions.

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Which leads to the curious emphasis on "normality" discussed throughout the whole book. There is seemingly little room for appreciation of deviation from a sort of idealized developmental path for children. Perhaps this is true and the scientific literature so widely accepted that it can be discussed by a physician in an almost flippant way. Yet, coming from a social perspective, Perry's overemphasis on divisions between the expected and the "subnormal" seem devisive and unhelpful of his general proposition that empathy, love, and compassion are the keys to healthy humanity. The book is nonetheless interesting if not almost unbelievable at times.

Worth reading on a train. Nov 14, Victoria rated it liked it Shelves: audio , non-fiction. This nonfiction audiobook is definitely an intriguing listen. The author, a prominent child psychologist, reflects upon his more high profile and memorable cases. Though Perry uses pseudonyms, each case history rings with authenticity, interspersed with the science and theories of the mind. Perry discusses a wide range of disorders and scenarios of the worst types of neglect.

Sexual abuse, outright neglect, Munchausen By Proxy, children of the Branch Davidians, orphans from Eastern Europe and ev This nonfiction audiobook is definitely an intriguing listen. Sexual abuse, outright neglect, Munchausen By Proxy, children of the Branch Davidians, orphans from Eastern Europe and even juvenile delinquents all fall into this fascinating book. And though this pride is certainly justifiable in the successes recounted here, it makes the book slightly off-putting at times.

Apr 16, Tanya rated it it was amazing. If you work with or have kids, you should read this book. Trauma comes in all different kinds of ways, some quite horrific. But, this is an optimistic book about how we can heal trauma in the kids we come into contact with. Even though the book is optimistic, I could only read it a bit at a time because of some of the truly heartbreaking stories that we in the book.

He then served as screenwriter, before giving way to David Peoples, but maintained an Executive Producer credit. This interview was my second with Fancher, some six years after speaking with him for my film site Camera In The Sun about Blade Runner's production, his directing the film The Minus Man, his acting career in television Westerns during the s and 60s, growing up a mixed-race child in s East Los Angeles, and his long love affair with Flamenco dancing -- which took him all the way to Spain as a teenager.

During this interview, we discussed Fancher's love of writing, some of his favorite authors, and how their work affected him. He then read some of his poetry and short stories, including from his book of short works, titled The Shape of the Final Dog, published by Penguin Group imprint Blue Rider Press.

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