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ISBN 13: 9780140438017

Pages Liked by This Page. Sky Sport News HD. ESPN America. Sky Sports. Lord Ballandine loves Fanny and is determined to marry her. He won't be easily dissuaded. The book alternates back and forth between these two dramatic love stories. Trollope created some memorable characters in this one. I really loved getting to spend time with Fanny especially! I liked Anty well enough, I suppose, but she spent a lot of time in bed almost dying. Anty is one of those good--practically saintly--characters.

Imagine someone apologizing for still breathing, and you've got the right idea. Anty's biggest flaw is that she wants every single person to be happy and get what they want. And that's just not possible. Fanny was a strong character, for the most part.

More books from this author: Anthony Trollope

Yes, she was persuaded--for a day, maybe two, to follow her uncle's advice, but she remains true to her heart, and VOCAL about what she wants. I really enjoyed spending time with these two. I didn't prefer one story to the other really. Both were compelling. I really enjoyed Trollope's writing. He sketches scenes and characters very well! Here's a description of Sally, one of Mrs. Kelly's servants. Kelly kept two ordinary in-door servants to assist in the work of the house; one, an antiquated female named Sally, who was more devoted to her tea-pot than ever was any bacchanalian to his glass.

Were there four different teas in the inn in one evening, she would have drained the pot after each, though she burst in the effort. Sally was, in all, an honest woman, and certainly a religious one; — she never neglected her devotional duties, confessed with most scrupulous accuracy the various peccadillos of which she might consider herself guilty; and it was thought, with reason, by those who knew her best, that all the extra prayers she said, — and they were very many, — were in atonement for commissions of continual petty larceny with regard to sugar.

On this subject did her old mistress quarrel with her, her young mistress ridicule her; of this sin did her fellow-servant accuse her; and, doubtless, for this sin did her Priest continually reprove her; but in vain. Though she would not own it, there was always sugar in her pocket, and though she declared that she usually drank her tea unsweetened, those who had come upon her unawares had seen her extracting the pinches of moist brown saccharine from the huge slit in her petticoat, and could not believe her.

Favorite quotes: Time and the hour run through the longest day. I hope it may lead you to feel that you may be contented and in comfort without having everything which you think necessary to your happiness. It has given me a great deal of unmixed satisfaction. Nor will I submit to whatever fate cold, unfeeling people may doom me, merely because I am a woman and alone. I will not give up Lord Ballindine, if I have to walk to his door and tell him so. And were I to do so, I should never think that I had forgotten myself. For one thing I have to thank you: you have dispelled the idea that I could look for help to anyone in this family.

This was Trollope's second novel, and although the plot, which deals with two courtships, isn't as balanced as it could be and would be later , it does show much of what characterizes Trollope's work. There's a nicely realized setting Ireland, where Trollope worked for the Post Office for some years , good characters though his character analysis isn't yet as sharp and perceptive as it would later become , and wry humor.

Apr 05, Ginny rated it it was amazing. I loved this early work. Trollope was only 33 when he wrote this. It sold copies at the time, but I think it is one of his best. It is more tightly written more self-edited perhaps? Mar 20, David rated it liked it Shelves: trollope. This is Trollope's second novel. It is better than his first novel, The Macdermots of Ballycloran, and, like it, is set in Ireland, where Trollope lived for several years while working for the British post office.

Important trivia: Trollope is the inventor of the mailbox.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing. The Kellys and the O'Kellys

Not the one at your door, but the one on the street where anyone can deposit mail to be sent. Jul 18, Tom James rated it liked it. The story of two Irish families, one aristocratic the O'Kellys and one middle class the Kellys who each have an elder son seeking marriage.

Starkey Supported Employment - Carlos O'Kelly's

Set in , prior to the potato famine the book was written in , the book does not deal with that matter at all. This is Trollope's second novel and The story of two Irish families, one aristocratic the O'Kellys and one middle class the Kellys who each have an elder son seeking marriage. This is Trollope's second novel and it did not sell well when it was first published.

It is, nevertheless, a beautifully crafted story with characters that seem real, many of whom you would like to know. Typical Trollope fare, the novel deals with character, money, domestic injustice, and tests of integrity. Not-so-typical of Trollope is that he deals with the issue of family domestic abuse as well. If you like the novels of Trollope or of Jane Austen, or you enjoyed "Downton Abbey", by all means, read this book. Great characters and a wry sense of humour made this book very enjoyable although I did feel that the plot was overly predictable.

Jan 06, Lauretta rated it it was ok. Trollope is a wonderful author with incredible insight into the human character. This was his first book. He only improved with time! I love Anthony Trollope so much. At first you think this is going to be book about the Repealers' trial of , but as soon as you have read the explanatory notes and worked out what the Repeal movement was all about, Trollope largely abandons the poor repealers and settles down to the love lives of Martin Kelly, a Catholic farmer, and Lord Ballandine, Martin's Protestant landlord and the O'Kelly of the title.

Martin is courting Anastasia Lynch, who is older than him and has unexpectedly inherited some mone 3.

On hallowed turf

Martin is courting Anastasia Lynch, who is older than him and has unexpectedly inherited some money from her father on his death. This makes Anastasia's brother Barry furious he expected to inherit everything and she escapes from his abuse to move in with Martin's mother and sisters. The plot line concerning Barry's evil and unscrupulous scheming is fairly entertaining, but Anastasia herself is a strangely insubstantial character. She is at times a petrified of her brother believing whatever he tells her, b wise enough to keep hold of her inheritance, c loving to her brother and concerned for his salvation, d determined to leave him all her money after he scares her almost literally to death.

I did not feel that her character was consistent and fully drawn. Martin's mother, on the other hand, was excellent and very believable. Lord Ballandine does not see his fiancee Fanny at all until the final chapters as her guardian keeps them apart. While Fanny is fairly well fleshed out, I found Frank also to be a bit shadowy and inconsistent. The plot by her guardian to have his dissolute son court Fanny was one of the most successful parts of the story for me.

The two strands Martin and Frank were only loosely connected and the switches between the two parts of the story were somewhat abrupt - I tended to forget what had happened in the other half by the time we returned to it. Sep 01, Surreysmum rated it liked it Shelves: , classics-british , e-version. As the title indicates, this is a bifurcated tale of two distantly related Irish families, the Kellys being merchant class and the O'Kellys minor Irish aristocrats. In each case there is a threatened love affair with an unattractive male antagonist. For Anty Lynch and Martin Kelly it is Anty's abusive brother, a nasty piece of work determined to possess himself of his sister's half of the inheritance, no matter the means.

For Frank O'Kelly, Lord Ballindine, and his beloved Fanny Wyndham, the ant As the title indicates, this is a bifurcated tale of two distantly related Irish families, the Kellys being merchant class and the O'Kellys minor Irish aristocrats. For Frank O'Kelly, Lord Ballindine, and his beloved Fanny Wyndham, the antagonist is her guardian, Lord Cashel, along with Cashel's wastrel son who pretends to her hand, and once again the primary motive for the villains is money.

Trollope amuses himself by juxtaposing the similar bad behaviour of both classes over drastically different amounts of money, and even injects a satiric note at one point by having "the O'Kelly" approach Martin Kelly for a small loan. Trollope opens this novel with the trial of O'Connell, but is not really a political tale. It delights in distinctive characters Martin's dominant innkeeper mother, the sinister gambling and horse-racing professional, "Dot" Blake, or self-deluding, inhibited Selina, daughter of Lord Cashel, and nearest complementary female to Fanny.

Trollope also brings in his favourite set piece of a hunt - he points out in his autobiography that he would use any excuse to have a hunting chapter a personal obsession in his non-writing life. I found the "Anty" story a bit more compelling than the "Fanny" story - the woman is more vulnerable and less perfect - but the whole was reasonably well integrated and a fun read.

Surprised that it sank without a trace, by Trollope's own account. Otherwise, enjoyable enough twisted pair of parallel tales with some charming, vilainous, and suitably absurd characters like the cousin who advises Fanny to get over her heartbreak by reading another volume of Gibbon. Armstrong the parson, and Mrs Kelly were among my favourites. I quite like the way Trollope signposts that some impending disaster is not going to happen before he describes how it doesn't occur - saves lots of stress during the reading. Quite a lot of Irish English dialect in dialogue rendered through spelling eg.

May 27, Lucy rated it liked it. If I hadn't been determined to read all of Trollope's novels, I might well have abandoned this one. The opening, dealing as it does with Irish politics of the mid nineteenth century, is tedious in the extreme. Trollope can often be a bit slow to get going, and this novel is as bad as any in that regard. But I persevered, and there is a lot to interest the Trollope enthusiast.

Really, this is two separate novels - the strands of the landlord and tenant do not weave together in any meaningful sens If I hadn't been determined to read all of Trollope's novels, I might well have abandoned this one. Really, this is two separate novels - the strands of the landlord and tenant do not weave together in any meaningful sense, though taken as a whole they fill out the picture of life in Ireland at the time. The characterisations do improve as the novel progresses, though the picky reader may claim that actually they change rather than develop - Martin is nicer than we are led to believe at the outset, Fanny is a stronger character - and I think that it's the author changing his mind rather than plot development.

So the main interest of this novel is in its author's future - if you are new to him, don't start here. Nov 19, Duckpondwithoutducks rated it liked it Shelves: fiction-classics. In most Anthony Trollope novels, there are quite a few characters, and you would think from the title of this book that the main characters last names would be Kelly and O'Kelly which is a euphonious title. But to me the main characters didn't seem to be the Kellys and the O'Kellys, but rather Lord Cashel's family and their cousin Fanny Wyndham, and the Lynches.

Lord Cashel's son is a prodigal wastrel, and he hopes for him to marry his cousin, Fanny, who happens to be an heiress. But, Fanny is In most Anthony Trollope novels, there are quite a few characters, and you would think from the title of this book that the main characters last names would be Kelly and O'Kelly which is a euphonious title. Another main plot line is of Barry Lynch and his sister Anty, from whom he wishes to wrest her inheritance, by means fair or foul! But she wishes to marry Martin Kelly and share her money with his family. This is still one of Trollope's early novels, and doesn't have quite the same appeal as his more mature works, but it was interesting.

Sep 12, Janine Wilson rated it liked it. This is Trollope's second book and certainly not his best. But I was interested in how the author included the political events of the time, the Repeal movement in Ireland and the trial of Daniel O'Connor, as a backdrop to the main plot. Unfortunately he is assuming some familiarity with these events, so I had to resort to Wikipedia. There was a scene where one Protestant minister describes a pro-Repeal Catholic crowd as if they were dangerous maniacs who were a threat to the lives of his family This is Trollope's second book and certainly not his best.

There was a scene where one Protestant minister describes a pro-Repeal Catholic crowd as if they were dangerous maniacs who were a threat to the lives of his family, although there was clearly little reason for his fear, while another Protestant minister attempted to get him to see how unrealistic and unfounded his fears were, to no avail.

This kind of demonizing of one's opponents seemed all too familiar. This is a multi-layered story of manners and morals among various social strata; while frequently quite humorous, it doesn't shy away from noting the political upheaval on the horizon which would define Anglo-Hibernian relations for the next century-and-a-half.

William Trevor, in his introduction to the Oxford Classics edition wrote, "Early as its place is in Trollope's canon [], th The O'Kellys are the tenants of the Kellys in the semi-feudal society of early-Victorian, pre-Famine Ireland.

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William Trevor, in his introduction to the Oxford Classics edition wrote, "Early as its place is in Trollope's canon [], this novel is one of the best he ever wrote". My personal favorite line because Trollope seems to have known us so well : "the race of O'Kellys had never been great gardeners.