Manual George Remus and an Ideal Retirement: An Ed McCorkel Mystery (Ed McCorkel Mysteries Book 1)

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Steiner's interest in music began as a young child. When he was twelve, he became the hat check person at his father's music lodge in Milwaukee. He also took piano lessons and while a student at the University of Wisconsin - Madison he took lessons from Jessie Cohen. He also attended Axel Christianson's music school. As a teenager, Steiner fixed his friends' radios and would hear a variety of music, which prompted him to spend many hours listening to music broadcasts.

The interest expanded when his aunt Julianna, who worked at a music store, would bring home chipped phonographs for him to listen to, during the era when not everyone owned a phonograph player. One record that made an early impression was the Dixieland Jazz Band. Louis Blues. Steiner was heavily influenced early on by Chicago music, partially because of its proximity to Milwaukee; it was more difficult for New York music to make its way to the Midwest. He later said that Duke Ellington and Bix Beiderbecke were his top favorites.

It was in the s that Steiner started visiting the South Side clubs. His first was the Grand Terrace in where he saw Earl Hines. During this time he wrote for Tempo magazine and was also a correspondent for Jazz Information. In the mids, Steiner moved to Chicago and from he worked at Miner Laboratories, after which he became the Director of Chemical Research Laboratories. Steiner's interest in recording was prompted mostly through the people he knew, such as his next door neighbor Paul Edward Miller, a writer for Downbeat.

Karl-Heinz Roseman – Page 5 – McFarland

Davis worked for Seeburg, the jukebox company, and had access to equipment for pressing records. Around , Steiner and Davis started recording music in the clubs. As part of the new business, Steiner also started a "record exchange" for collectors interested in rare jazz records. Their focus was on new artists as well as reissuing records from the s and s, many of them from Paramount Records.

Critical Perspectives on White-Authored Narratives of Black Life

After Davis' departure, Steiner moved the headquarters to the Uptown Playhouse Theater, where he worked as their promoter and also lived. Steiner also managed New York Recording Laboratories in and became owner in During his time in Chicago, Steiner worked with many musicians and often hosted them at his apartment on Ashland and later at his renovated house on Greenview formerly the Kosciuszko Public Bath for social events and recording sessions.

He recorded some of these musicians for the Paramount Records label and over time he also interviewed many of them. In , Steiner met Charles Sengstock and a few years later began the massive project of going through microfilmed copies of the Chicago Defender at the Chicago Public Library to create an index of clubs, venues, performances, musicians, and all instances of jazz mentioned in the paper.

Steiner also started teaching chemistry at the University of Illinois-Chicago in In the s, Steiner helped found the Chicago Jazz Institute, which started as a series of concerts at places such as the Field Museum. Later, he was a founding member of, and very active in, the Jazz Institute of Chicago. Steiner retired from his position as a chemistry professor from University of Illinois-Chicago in , at which time he and Nina moved back to Milwaukee.

He continued to stay involved in the Chicago jazz scene. For nearly eighty years, Steiner collected material about jazz music, musicians, recording companies, and many other topics of interest. He was internationally known as an expert on jazz and especially Chicago jazz and often acted as a source or consultant for articles, books, dissertations and theses, documentaries, and other productions of jazz history.


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The main focus of the collection is jazz and Chicago jazz, but the collection also documents other music styles such as blues, swing, boogie woogie, minstrel, and rag. Much of the original arrangement and description by Steiner was retained in the guide. Researchers will notice a certain amount of topical overlap between series. See each individual series description for more detail. Series I, Personal and Professional, contains correspondence, addresses, a stamp collection, academic appointment letters, and documents about the renovations of the Kosciuszko Public Bath into a house.

There are also research notes and articles, reports, correspondence, and other material that documents his career as a chemist. Series II, Correspondence, contains letters with family, friends, musicians and their relatives, students, researchers, authors, editors, producers, collectors, and record dealers, and may include manuscripts, invitations, photographs, advertisements, announcements, and articles. Most correspondence is between Steiner and jazz researchers. There are also catalogs, correspondence, and material about other record companies. Series IV, Musicians and People, contains articles, research notes, and ephemera about musicians and other people related to the music industry, including record producers, composers, songwriters, conductors, bandleaders, accompanists, singers, dancers, writers, actors, comedians, radio and television programmers and producers, instrument makers, jukebox repairmen, club and ballroom owners, disc jockeys and announcers, agents, record shop owners, architects, collectors, authors, and others.

Faculty Bibliographies

Series V, Clubs, Events, and Ephemera, contains articles, reviews, publications, maps, advertisements, pluggers, postcards, fliers, programs, playbills, tickets, correspondence, matchbooks, brochures, invitations, research notes, and other ephemera about clubs, club memberships, restaurants, bars, pubs, cafes, lounges, theatres, dance halls, ballrooms, hotels, buildings, schools, universities, concerts, performances, festivals, cruises, and other jazz venues, neighborhoods, events, and people in Chicago and the surrounding area.

Series VI, Photographs, contains photographic prints, negatives, and slides of musicians, clubs, locations, and other subjects. Steiner's research notes contain documentation or attempted verification of musicians' names, where they played and who they played with, as well as where clubs were located, moved to, and who played there. Series VII, Subject Files, contains articles, fliers, brochures, book reviews, radio schedules, directories, catalogs, correspondence, cartoons, ephemera, essays, book chapters, and research notes.

The material documents the history of jazz, Chicago jazz, and other musical styles such as gospel, blues, swing, rock and pop, boogie woogie, country, hillbilly, minstrel, and bluegrass. The majority of the music is for piano, but also saxophone, banjo, and ukulele. Series IX, Publications, contains magazines, newspapers, and journals primarily about jazz but also the entertainment industry. Series X, Artifacts, contains print blocks, souvenirs and other jazz related objects, electrical items, and science equipment. Series XI, Audio-Visual, contains an audio cassette, 8 and 16 mm film, a videocassette, microfilm, and product sample records.

Series XII, Oversize, contains artwork, articles, posters, ephemera, advertisements, records lists, album and sheet music images, and photographs. Browse finding aids by topic. Subseries 1, Personal, contains addresses, business cards, a personal calendar, class notes from a computer class, invoices for Oxford University Press, and retirement documents. The biographical material includes a family genealogy, interviews and articles about Steiner, as well as his personal reflections on his life and family. Steiner kept articles, documents, and a scrapbook of the renovation and history of his house on Greenview in Chicago, formerly the Kosciuszko Public Bath.

The stamp collection contains jazz, United States, and foreign stamps. There are documents about his donations, teaching, and involvement at various universities. Also included is Steiner's Ph. Subseries 3, Travel, contains maps, postcards, street guides, brochures, ephemera, and notes on his personal travel.

See Series VI for additional photographs. Series II, Correspondence, is arranged alphabetically and contains letters with family, friends, musicians and their relatives, students, researchers, authors, editors, producers, collectors, and record dealers, and may include manuscripts, invitations, photographs, advertisements, announcements, and articles.

The majority of the correspondence is incoming and outgoing from Steiner although there are some third party correspondence. Much of the correspondence is inquiries from researchers to Steiner about musicians, recordings, venues, and other aspects of jazz history. In many cases he either loaned original material or provided copies of recordings, photographs, articles, interviews, and other documentation. There are also requests for permission to use audio or photographs for publications, radio, television, or film.

Some correspondence is from Steiner to other musicians or collectors for information about jazz clubs and musicians in Chicago for Destination Chicago Jazz. There is correspondence about donations, appraisals, and auctions of jazz collections. Most of the family and personal correspondence includes holiday greetings, invitations, and letters to friends and family about personal events.

There are order forms, job tickets, invoices, recording session forms, contracts, copyright applications and renewals, stationery, and other administrative documents about the function of the companies. Subseries 2, Record Collecting, Companies, and Catalogs, contains correspondence, order lists and forms, discographies, fliers, brochures, pamphlets, articles, invoices, newsletters, announcements, record catalogs, journals, and research notes about record companies, store owners, producers, distributors, auctions, collectors, sellers, and musicians.

He also contacted companies about purchasing their releases, record exchanges, international distribution, and royalties.

Guide to the John Steiner Collection 1860-2001

Other letters are requests from researchers or collectors for catalogs, information about the recording label, and availability of records. Most catalogs and discographies are for jazz recordings, but also include blues, folk, swing, gospel, international, and others.

There is some information about non-music recordings, such as language, spoken word, instructional audio, and video. Some catalogs are in Italian, French, or German. Subseries 3, Recording Equipment and Technology, contains catalogs, advertisements, fliers, articles, journals, and research notes about radios, phonographs, cassette tapes, compact discs, record albums, amplifiers, stereos, recording equipment, turntables, speakers, digital technology, and other technology and equipment related to radios, television, record players, and recording.

Subseries 4, Album Labels, contain labels primarily from Paramount Records but also other record companies. Boerner Company. There are record books and ledgers from the Wisconsin Chair Company and its subsidiaries. Both subseries are arranged alphabetically by last name. As much as possible, given names and nicknames are included as well as different spellings of names. Most material is primarily about musicians and bands, but also included are other people in the entertainment industry such as record producers, composers, songwriters, conductors, bandleaders, accompanists, singers, dancers, writers, actors, comedians, radio and television programmers and producers, instrument makers, jukebox repairmen, club and ballroom owners, disc jockeys and announcers, agents, record shop owners, architects, collectors, authors, and others.

Most of the musicians and people are related to the various types of jazz and blues, as well as vaudeville, gospel, soul, boogie-woogie, swing, bebop, classical, pop, rock, and others. Some of the people are related to African-American or Chicago history. The folders contain original or photocopied newspaper and magazine articles, correspondence, discographies, advertisements, songs and sheet music, newsletters, journals, announcements and reviews of performances, fliers, programs, ticket stubs, cartoons, stationery, interviews, commentaries, autobiographical and biographical statements, greeting cards, stamps, postcards, record labels, books, album reviews, obituaries, and research notes.

The correspondence is between Steiner and jazz researchers, enthusiasts, and historians, as well as record shop owners and the musicians, and may contain notes, discographies, and other documents from researchers. A few articles are in French or German. Subseries 1, Chicago, contains articles, reviews, publications, maps, advertisements, pluggers, postcards, fliers, programs, playbills, tickets, correspondence, matchbooks, brochures, invitations, research notes, and other ephemera about clubs, club memberships, restaurants, bars, pubs, cafes, lounges, theatres, dance halls, ballrooms, hotels, buildings, schools, universities, concerts, performances, festivals, cruises, and other jazz venues, neighborhoods, events, and people in Chicago and the surrounding area.

The checklists for appeared in the spring issues of the Quarterly for the following years. Beginning with the list of publications, the checklist has appeared in a supplementary issue of the Quarterly. The first eight are conflated and supplemented in Southern Literature A Checklist of Scholarship, ed. Jerry T.

Williams Boston: G. Hall, Louis D. Rubin, Jr. Items which carry the date but appeared too late for this list will appear in next year's. A key to abbreviations not included there appears at the end of this checklist. Cross-references for authors not in the main list appear at the end, and an Index of Authors of works listed in the checklist, keyed by entry numbers, appears at the very end. Items for the checklist should be sent to the chairman of the committee: George C. Longest, Department of English, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA , who would like to thank all who have contributed during the past year.

Checklist editor: Jerry T. Williams Computer Programmer and Consultant: W.

Table of contents

Edwin Ellis. Harriet Jacobs and Douglass, with mentions of some others. Malloy, Jeanne M. An unknown error has occurred.